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1st Pattern HBT Trouser
1st Pattern HBT Trouser


 
: $59.99
Sale Price: $34.99
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Product Description Sizing Information
 

During the 1930's, the US Army's work/ fatigue uniform was made from blue denim. Just prior to WWII, the impracticality of such clothing became painfully obvious and a new design was created using a light green herringbone twill fabric. The OQMG decided to use the same pattern as khaki summer service pants for the new HBT models. Referred to as the "1st pattern (sometimes 1st model)" HBT uniform, production began in 1941 and continued until the end of 1942 when it was replaced with a simpler design (2nd pattern). The 1st Pattern HBT's were worn throughout WWII and are occasionally seen in Korea.

ATF Reproductions: The 1st Pattern trousers have 4 internal pockets, button fly, belt loops, and straight legs. There are a couple of variations encountered on authentic WWII trousers- the pockets can be made from white twill or the same HBT as the shell, and several types of buttons were used by the different contractors. We chose white twill lining and the typical 13 star tack buttons. Our fabric is 100% cotton HBT, dyed to match an original, unissued, unfaded example.

For more information see the WWII HBT uniform page.

All Inseams are 34".

Sizing/ Shrinkage: Our trousers are made using modern size scales- just order your normal casual trouser (jeans/ chinos) size.
WARNING! Like all cotton pants (or shirts) the inseam will shrink when washed! Our inseams are accurate, 34" when new. Final shrinkage is 1.5-2 inches on the inseams. Do not hem them until after you have washed them!
Washing instructions: We recommend cold wash (machine or hand) and hang dry for all cotton uniforms. These uniforms will survive washing in warm or hot water and machine drying, such actions will speed up fading and decrease the life of the garment(s).

Imported

If we made these in the USA, we'd have to buy the fabric in Asia anyway (the US mills are all gone) and the price would triple.